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Carbonless Paper Pioneer Lowell Schleicher dies


July 28, 2003
By Pulp & Paper Canada

Appleton, WI Lowell Schleicher, whose work with the microencapsulation process led to the invention of carbonless…

Appleton, WI Lowell Schleicher, whose work with the microencapsulation process led to the invention of carbonless paper, died June 30, 2003. He was 78.
"Our condolences go out to the family of Lowell Schleicher. Lowell was a brilliant scientist, a great inventor and a true gentleman," said Doug Buth, Appleton’s chief executive officer. "His contributions to the invention of carbonless paper helped to shape the success of Appleton Papers (now Appleton for the past 50 years."
Born in Glenwood Springs, CO, Schleicher earned a bachelor’s degree in chemistry from Hillsdale College, Hillsdale, MI, and a master’s degree in colloid chemistry from the University of Michigan. Soon after graduation he began his research career as a chemist with the National Cash Resister Company in Dayton, OH.
While at NCR Corporation, Schleicher began working with Barry Green, a company scientist who introduced the first commercial example of a system of liquid-filled microcapsules dispersed within a solid coating. It was this microencapsulation system that was used to develop carbonless paper.
Schleicher, Green and others at NCR Corporation collaborated with Appleton Coated Paper Company, the predecessor company to Appleton, to commercially introduce carbonless paper in 1954. Schleicher continued to work with Appleton and, after NCR Corporation acquired Appleton Coated Paper Company in 1971, he moved to Appleton in 1973 and was named Appleton Papers’ director of basic research, a position he held until his retirement in May, 1990.

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