Pulp and Paper Canada

News
CONSERVATION: Mapping Water Use


February 1, 2002
By Pulp & Paper Canada

Before one can “tighten” the water supply, one has to know to where the water is flowing. A water map gives mills information on water use. Typically, it is a schematic diagram of a water system. The …

Before one can “tighten” the water supply, one has to know to where the water is flowing. A water map gives mills information on water use. Typically, it is a schematic diagram of a water system. The ideal sketch will show all the areas where water flows branch off, as well as showing hand valves and control valves.

The job is time-consuming, mainly because the information, particularly in older mills, will be hard to find. But these could be good starting sources. It is likely that you will have to physically trace the water lines throughout the mill, while checking the position and function of manual and control valves along the way.

Advertisement

The water map serves as a baseline to determining the water balance. “The water map is a start,” says Roxar Thompson, a scientist at Paprican in Pointe Claire. “Afterward, it is important to do mass-balance, energy-balance and life-cycle analyses.” — Perry J. Greenbaum


Print this page

Related



Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*