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ENERGY: THE SALAASTI SQUEEZE SAVES MONEY, ENERGY

VANCOUVER, BC -- When the implementation of the Kyoto Protocol to reduce greenhouse gas emissions begins, the maximum use of biomass as a source of renewable energy is an area that is expected to see ...


March 1, 2000
By Pulp & Paper Canada

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VANCOUVER, BC — When the implementation of the Kyoto Protocol to reduce greenhouse gas emissions begins, the maximum use of biomass as a source of renewable energy is an area that is expected to see rapid growth. Salaasti Process Machinery has two presses said to represent the best available technology (BAT) in their respective fields. At the current level of purchased primary energy prices, the use of BAT in energy supply optimization, energy conservation and mill modernization could reduce the cost of energy in Canadian mills by $40 to $50/t of bleached market pulp. The Bark Master is designed to dewater bark and hog fuel and when practical, sludge mixed with bark. These presses can be used as the final sludge pressing stage after screw-type presses. Solids retention in combination pressing is good and the Bark Master’s high hydraulic capacity can handle infeed moisture content can vary widely. The Waste Master sludge press is designed for the final dewatering of fibrous sludge that is discharged from a belt or screw press at a moisture content that is too high. With the Waste Master, the goal is to reduce sludge moisture content to the 50 to 55% level. This press uses a patented method of steam heating (Therminating) that minimizes the use of steam and maximizes the sludge dry solids content after the press. Sludge suitability for dewatering can be evaluated in the Salaasti laboratory from a sample as small as five gallons. At today’s level of primary energy costs, the simple payback of one of these bark press units varies from one to two years. In 1999, seven new Salaasti presses were commissioned including a Bark Master at Howe Sound Pulp and Paper, Port Mellon, BC. It is the mill’s third.

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