Pulp and Paper Canada

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Getting a Lot From a Little: Trends


September 1, 2009
By Pulp & Paper Canada

PPC asked the top four paper machine clothing suppliers to the Canadian industry what new applications they focused on in the last year, and what market drivers prompted them to direct resources to th…

PPC asked the top four paper machine clothing suppliers to the Canadian industry what new applications they focused on in the last year, and what market drivers prompted them to direct resources to these particular areas. Here is a compilation of their responses.

Albany International: Value creation with our forming, pressing, drying, and belting products is paramount. The main value drivers for our customers with many machines running at reduced operating rates or speeds are energy, sheet quality, drainage, and predictable life. In the forming section, triple-layer fabrics such as our InLine have reduced energy, improved sheet quality and productivity. We also introduced a new press fabric called Pressision and the trials have shown a significant improvement in sheet dewatering and overall energy.

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Weavexx and Huyck. Wangner: Our focus continues to be on developing and applying paper machine clothing technology that provides demonstrable and sustainable value to the papermaker. Some examples include our newest line of forming fabrics, Graphixx, which helps customers in the premium board and packaging grades to improve their sheet finish.

Voith Paper: The market continues to move forward and use of seamed fabrics in all applications is increasing. Therefore safe and easy installation is key. Voith has been working on the second generation of our Advanced Seam Technology. The newest design, AS G2, is yielding higher performance in a wide range of paper grades and press configurations.

AstenJohnson: For North America, demand continues to grow for better seamed press fabrics that meet the needs of ever-demanding applications. A lot of our research and product development is focused on new ways to reduce the seam joint defect so it can run on tissue machines and high-speed shoe presses without adversely affecting the productivity or quality of product for those applications.


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