Pulp and Paper Canada

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Paper Week Review: Safe and easy does it!

FIRST PRIZE goes to Albni Leblanc, Bowater Maritimes, in Dalhousie, NB:Carry Strap Dispenser & Organizer for Rail Cars.The newsprint rolls located between the two rail car doors need to be tied toget...


March 1, 2002
By Pulp & Paper Canada

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FIRST PRIZE goes to Albni Leblanc, Bowater Maritimes, in Dalhousie, NB:

Carry Strap Dispenser & Organizer for Rail Cars.

The newsprint rolls located between the two rail car doors need to be tied together during shipping. This is achieved by using carry straps. In the past, an employee would enter the rail car and hold the carry strap until a roll was placed against the carry strap to hold it in position. This practice was deemed unsafe. The carry strap dispenser and organizer, made of carbon steel and welded, rectified this situation by allowing up to three carry straps to be dispensed and held in position without having an employee enter the railcar. It is mobile and incorporates a mast, which holds three rings whose vertical positions are adjustable and guide the carry straps.

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SECOND PRIZE goes to Lucien Nault and Robert Hamel of Kruger in Bromptonville, QC:

Felt Cutter

The purpose of this cutter is to trim the edge of the wet and dry felts installed on the paper machine, at a precise distance all along the cutting and this, in a fast end and secure way. The knife is manufactured of steel, aluminium and with two stiff plastic handles. A cutter blade for gypsum sheets is used to cut the felt. It suffices to move the cutting edge to the desired position (cutting distance) to lock it in place and hold the tools by the handles with both hands, which makes it very secure. Afterwards, the felt has to be advanced in an intermittent way until the felt has made a complete turn. It is also light and portable.

THIRD PRIZE goes to Marc Tremblay of Spruce Falls, Kapuskasing, ON:

Chainfall Carrier

This device is used to primarily carry and store chainfalls safely and can also be used for other hoisting and rigging mechanisms. Previously, chainfalls were often thrown over the shoulder onto the back which is a dangerous practice. Now, with a simple 3/8″ of round mild steel (4′ long) and one 5″ piece of 5/8″ standard black iron pipe welded at three points, it is possible to create a tool in-house from standard stock materials that saves on wear and tear that comes from dropping and dragging, allows workers to protect their backs and lift safely with the knees and creates the possibility of carrying two chainfalls at once.