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Paperworkers’ union supports Greenpeace’s suggestions to stimulate northern forestry


November 30, 2010
By Pulp & Paper Canada

Greenpeace and the Communications, Energy and Paperworkers Union of Canada (CEP) held a joint news conference mid-November to release a new report with recommendations for stimulating northern Ontario’s forest industry and creating green…

Greenpeace and the Communications, Energy and Paperworkers Union of Canada (CEP) held a joint news conference mid-November to release a new report with recommendations for stimulating northern Ontario’s forest industry and creating green forestry jobs while preserving the ecological value of Canada’s boreal forest.

“Our report shows Premier Dalton McGuinty and Northern Development, Mines and Forestry Minister Michael Gravelle that they have a real opportunity now in northwestern Ontario to get the forestry industry back on track,” said Catharine Grant, Greenpeace forest campaigner. “By following through with the recommendations in this report, they can help the forestry industry prosper through diversification and access to expanding green markets.”

The Greenpeace report, “Building a Green Economy in the Boreal Forest,” lays out a vision for the development of the boreal forest to build new, stable, viable economies that communities can count on in the long term, while preserving the tremendous ecological values contained in the boreal forest. 

Kim Ginter, CEP’s Ontario Region Vice-President, says paperworkers support the report’s recommendations.

“Forest workers have taken a major hit over the last few years,” said Ginter. “Provincial and federal governments need to take immediate concrete steps to stimulate the forestry sector so northwestern families can continue working in their communities. Building a Green Economy shows both governments how to take these steps.”

Report recommendations to provincial and federal governments include:

– Provide green tax credits and conservation funding,

– Adopt ecosystem-based management and Forest Stewardship Council certification,

– Allocate more Crown forests for community-based initiatives and value added processing,

– Provide transition funding to help forest-dependent communities diversify,

– Support non-timber forest products and services such as wild food and ecotourism,

– Increase co-management arrangements with First Nations.


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