Pulp and Paper Canada

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Remember the Pulp and Paper Pavilion at Expo ’67?


August 1, 2013
By Pulp & Paper Canada

During our 100th anniversary celebration at FPAC we’re having fun hearing from former employees and veterans of the forest industry from across Canada.We established a Facebook page and are encouraging people to submit photos and share…

During our 100th anniversary celebration at FPAC we’re having fun hearing from former employees and veterans of the forest industry from across Canada.
We established a Facebook page and are encouraging people to submit photos and share stories from the past. If you have some stories or photos you think would be interesting additions to our timeline, please pass them along.
As I travel the country telling people about our proud past and our promising future, I’m always interested to hear local stories of adventure and entrepreneurship. I hear quiet Canadian pride – pride in their community and the contribution they make to society. And I hear stories about interesting characters in our industry – we do seem to have lots of interesting personalities in this business.
One day I met a friend, George, for lunch and was telling him about my new job at FPAC. I explained that 2013 is the 100th anniversary of FPAC and we had been looking through boxes of archives. One box contained costumes from the Pulp and Paper Pavilion at Expo ’67 in Montreal, back when the pulp and paper sector was Canada’s largest industry.
George looked at me and said, “My wife worked in that pavilion.” What a small world! Of course, I immediately said that she had to come into the office, see some of the archive materials and tell us a little about her experiences as the lead hostess at the Expo ’67 pavilion.
A couple of weeks later Donna Haynal came into our office and told me the Pulp and Paper Pavilion was one of the biggest hits at Expo ’67. The pavilion had three components. The first pod was a skit with a mix of animation projected on the walls and live actors telling the story of the pulp and paper industry. The second pod was a live-action skit of a ‘wacky professor’ in a white lab coat explaining the science behind the pulp- and paper-making processes. Finally, as you exited, you could work with some interactive displays to make your own paper.
One of the most interesting discoveries from our walk down memory lane was that Donna still fit in her old hostess costume (her initials were inked on the inside collar). Here is a 1967 photo from Donna and a photo we took of her in the same costume in the FPAC office.

This is an excerpt from the President’s Blog, a Dialog about the Forest Sector.  To read more, go to: www.fpac.ca/index.php/en/blog.

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