Pulp and Paper Canada

Features Environment Sustainability
SFI encourages responsible sourcing for bioenergy from woody feedstocks


June 21, 2011
By Pulp & Paper Canada

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The Nature Conservancy (TNC) and the Sustainable Forestry Initiative® (SFI®) have launched a pilot project to help bioenergy companies in the United States support responsible forest management through their procurement of woody biomass.

The Nature Conservancy (TNC) and the Sustainable Forestry Initiative® (SFI®) have launched a pilot project to help bioenergy companies in the United States support responsible forest management through their procurement of woody biomass.

The project will assist facilities that produce renewable energy or transportation fuels from woody biomass to establish a responsible procurement system. SFI’s Fiber Sourcing requirements will be applied for the procurement system, and analysis will be conducted to identify gaps between existing procurement and SFI Fiber Sourcing requirements.

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“Woody biomass can be a great source of renewable energy and offers an excellent incentive so landowners can maintain their forests as forests — as long the forest is managed responsibly,” said Glenn Prickett, chief external affairs officer for The Nature Conservancy. “TNC is interested in this project with SFI to explore how the SFI Standard’s unique Fiber Sourcing requirements can address the need of responsible procurement of woody biomass for bioenergy facilities while managing for important forest values.”

Next steps for this project entail the identification of bioenergy facilities that can be project participants and will form the basis of our shared learning.

SFI Inc. is an independent non-profit charitable organization responsible for maintaining, overseeing, and improving the internationally recognized Sustainable Forestry Initiative (SFI) program.

The Nature Conservancy is an international, non-profit conservation organization with a mission to preserve the diversity of plants, animals and natural communities.