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SUSTAINING THE SEARCH FOR SUSTAINABLE PULPING


June 1, 2001
By Pulp & Paper Canada

STOCKHOLM, Sweden — A report in the annual review of the Swedish Pulp and Paper research Institute (STFI) details how the extensive research program entitled Ecocyclic Pulp Mill (KAM) has been approv…

STOCKHOLM, Sweden — A report in the annual review of the Swedish Pulp and Paper research Institute (STFI) details how the extensive research program entitled Ecocyclic Pulp Mill (KAM) has been approved by the Foundation for Strategic Environmental Research (MISTRA) for a second period of three years. STFI will continue to be the program host and supply research facilities and expertise. Research results from the first phase (1996-1999) show that the kraft pulping processes have significant potential to become more efficient. It was also shown that improved results can be achieved while reducing operating costs. The program vision is a completely ecocyclic system for high-quality paper products, which efficiently use the energy potential of the raw material biomass. Lennart Igerud, mill manager of Sodra Cell’s Varo mill said, “The type of research that KAM represents needs a synthesizing capacity that will keep researchers on tracks that are interesting for the industry to follow. This process has worked extremely well within KAM and is essential for producing relevant results. KAM has already clearly shown that today’s pulp process has the potential to meet criteria brought forward within the energy and environmental areas. At the same time, the program has succeeded in pointing out a great number of technical problems that now need to be solved.”

MAN AND THE FOREST

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EDMONTON, AB — Industry, government, the Alberta Conservation Association and the Alberta Research Council (ARC) are midway through a four-year, $1.4-million research project to study the effects of manmade disturbances on forest and fish resources in northwestern Alberta. “If we can quantify the ecological impacts of manmade disturbances, we can better manage Alberta’s boreal forests,” said Gary Scrimgeour, ARC research scientist and project manager. Objectives include developing and testing management strategies for forested riparian zones, understanding how fish are distributed throughout the watersheds and determining the effect of manmade disturbances on fish communities. Final reports will be submitted in March 2002 on Disturbance regimes and forested riparian buffer, Relationship between watershed characteristics and fish communities. The final study, Cumulative effects of watershed disturbances on fish communities in the Kakwa and Simonette watersheds will be submitted in March 2003. Seven partners fund the Northern Watershed Project including ARC, Alberta-Pacific Forest Industries and Daishowa-Marubeni International Ltd.

Further information about items appearing in R&D NEWS can be obtained by contacting the editorial offices of PULP & PAPER CANADA, phone 514-630-5955 or fax 514-630-5980. For Canada and the US, toll free, 1-800-363-1327.


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