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PacWest puts maintenance in the spotlight


June 13, 2013
By Pulp & Paper Canada

The manufacturing world is familiar with KPIs to measure performance, but when it comes to reliability and maintenance, most companies are only looking a high-level measures that do not specifically evaluate the performance of the maintenance…

The manufacturing world is familiar with KPIs to measure performance, but when it comes to reliability and maintenance, most companies are only looking a high-level measures that do not specifically evaluate the performance of the maintenance department, say the reliability experts speaking at the PacWest conference.

Speakers at PacWest’s opening forum had concrete suggestions for the mill personnel in the audience, suggesting they need to get out from the “tyranny of the urgent” and put in place better maintenance management systems.

The PacWest conference, an annual event of PAPTAC’s Pacific and Western Branches, runs from June 12-15 at Sun Peaks, B.C. The theme this year is “Improving performance through optimization and reliability.”

On the subject of maintenance business practices, Robert Landau, senior principal with Poyry Management Consulting, recommends the following performance indicators for the maintenance team:

–         schedule attainment (world class: > 95%),

–         emergency work (world class: < 5%),

–         work orders completed on time (world class: > 95%),

–         startup effectiveness (world class: > 95%),

–         rework (world class: < 5%).

Measures of this type give the maintenance department a greater sense of accountability and transparency, says Landau. Good maintenance business practices can reframe the definition of success for maintenance personnel, he adds.

Ian McKinnon, as a principal partner in the training firm Reliabilty Solutions, teaches that if companies want reliability in their manufacturing operations, maintenance and troubleshooting must always be performed in a known, precise, disciplined and documented manner. He notes that reliable manufacturing is not a core business value of most companies yet, although he has hopes that it will someday join safety and sustainability as core values for pulp and paper producers.


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