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UNB receives funding for biofuels research

The University of New Brunswick will receive $306,200 over three years to develop new technology to help Canada develop better, cleaner and cheaper renewable fuel from biomass.


February 18, 2015
By Pulp & Paper Canada

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The University of New Brunswick will receive $306,200 over three years to develop new technology to help Canada develop better, cleaner and cheaper renewable fuel from biomass.

UNB’s Dr. Ying Zheng, Canada Research Chair in Chemical Processes and Catalysis, and her team will work in collaboration with Queen’s University at Belfast and Atlantic Hydrogen Inc. to build on previous catalyst discoveries that improve biofuel quality and yields, and reduce the energy consumption involved in refining them. This research will allow small biorefineries to use this new technology as a cost-effective solution to produce the next generation of biofuels used in diesel and gasoline.

Dr. Zheng’s project is called “Integrated plasma catalytic processes for hydrogen-free upgrading of biomass-derived biofuels to hydrocarbon fuels.”

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These investments are the result of the 2014 Strategic Project Grants competition, administered by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC). Through this program, researchers work with companies on projects that will generate new knowledge and technology with the strong potential to strengthen Canada’s industrial base, generate wealth, and create employment opportunities in areas of importance to Canadians.  

“The University of New Brunswick is at the forefront of so many innovations,” says Mike Allen, Member of Parliament for Tobique—Mactaquac. “Our government is proud to support this research that will help businesses like Atlantic Hydrogen produce better, cleaner and cheaper biofuels while creating new job opportunities in New Brunswick.”

Also receiving funding under NSERC’s 2014 Strategic Project Grants competition is Robert Bradley of Universite de Sherbrooke in Quebec, for his project, “Predicting annual allowable cut in a changing world.”